Kelly Preston Hypes Sketchy Kirstie Alley Diet Products

December 7, 2011

Always be very wary of celebrities endorsing any kind of diet products, especially as there are no need for any of them.

Here’s a classic example:

Kelly Preston is heaping praise for her post-birth weight loss on Bff Kirstie Alley’s new diet plan. But Alley’s Organic Liaison products have the earmarks of a diet scam and a curious connection to the Church of Scientology.

The Church of Scientology, to which both Alley and Preston belong, appears to have an interest in the products.

The company’s Florida address is shared by the firm’s accountant, Saul B Lipson, a known Scientologist. His company is approved by the church and based near its headquarters in Clearwater, Fla.

Preston says she’s lost 39 pounds since giving birth to her third child, Benjamin, in November last year, overcoming concern whether her body would bounce back after getting pregnant at age 48.

“I was so excited when my best friend created Rescue Me…It’s pretty much the most genius thing ever,” she told People, crediting Kirstie’s Organic Liaison weight loss plan.

While the products Alley is pushing are too new to have undergone extensive testing, early reports have raised red flags about the effectiveness of the products.

The Organic Liaison site has no references to any scientific research that can prove this plan is beneficial to weight loss, although it claims the products are “USDA certified” organic.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) not the Department of Agriculture typically oversees diet products and food supplements.

The expensive supplements do not list ingredients. The program also requires automatic monthly billing. Both are diet industry red flags.

The complete monthly plan, which includes an online component plus the supplements costs $119 a month after an initial payment of $139.

The kit contains three supplements, “Rescue Me,” a detox and appetite suppresser, “Release Me,” a “relaxant” and “Nightingale,’ asleep aid.

Cheaper plans are offered, but the cost does not include the supplements, according to the site.

Like most sketchy diet products, Alley claims her plan can curb “cravings and boosts natural energy.”

The ingredients in the organic elixir “gently cleanse your body and replenish key nutrients naturally while you lose weight” the product claims.

Likely the real success to Kelly’s weight loss was her extensive workout routine. She says she exercised up to two hours a day.

Most nutrionists say a balance diet, reasonable portions and regular exercise are the best way to lose weight.

Preston and husband John Travolta tragically lost their son Jett, 16, two years ago after he suffered a fatal seizure during a family holiday in the Bahamas.

Kelly praised Scientology for helping her cope with the ordeal, so you know where her head is at.

Alley has become a wight-loss phenom after losing 100 pounds. But it’s a shame to see her use her name to promote questionable products.

And she really needs to explain the Scientology connection.

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